House for a grandmother / Philip Lütken

House for a grandmother / Philip Lütken - Interior photography, Windows, Brick, FacadeHouse for a grandmother / Philip Lütken - Interior photography, Tables, Shelves, WindowsHouse for a grandmother / Philip Lütken - Interior photography, BedroomHouse for a grandmother / Philip Lütken - More Images+ 13


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https://www.archdaily.cl/cl/1016579/casa-para-una-abuela-philip-lutken

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House for a grandmother / Philip Lütken - Exterior photography, Windows, Brick, Facade, Railings
Courtesy of Philip Lütken
House for a grandmother / Philip Lütken - Interior photography, Windows, Brick, Facade
Courtesy of Philip Lütken

Description submitted by the project team. In Copenhagen we find a large suburban area of ​​villas. Here, a grandmother moved into her daughter’s house. By selling her previous home, she became able to finance the construction of a small extension to her daughter’s house. An extension that connects to the existing one, but at the same time functions as a separate home for grandma, or multiple generations that may come in the future.

House for a grandmother / Philip Lütken - Interior photography, Tables, Shelves, Windows
Courtesy of Philip Lütken
House for a grandmother / Philip Lütken - Interior photography, Windows, Fixing Beams
Courtesy of Philip Lütken
House for a grandmother / Philip Lütken - Interior photography, Tables, Chairs, Windows
Courtesy of Philip Lütken

The project extends the house through a series of rooms and niches that descend in height to meet the scale of the garden. Throughout the project, corners are created both inside and outside. The new house stands as a solid framework for the daily life that will develop. The main space, with its generous height, can become a common space for both generations, while the services and bedrooms become more protected and intimate in scale.

House for a grandmother / Philip Lütken - Image 16 of 18
Plant

The house is built as an exploration of our common Danish building tradition: brick, porous concrete, wooden beams and cavity walls. The project attempts to understand how a house is built by making all these layers of the structure visible. To understand that the wall is not solid, but is made up of layers, each with individual properties. The interior load-bearing wall is built with large visible blocks, with large lintels that express the weight of the house. On the outside, the brickwork appears as a light casing with thin frames around the window. These two layers do not line up, allowing the window frames to be placed in the wall cavity. This dysplasia between the two layers results in uneven brick work where thick lime mortar joints fill the spaces.

House for a grandmother / Philip Lütken - Interior photography, Windows, Tiles, Fixing Beams
Courtesy of Philip Lütken
House for a grandmother / Philip Lütken - Interior photography, Wardrobes, Shelves, Fixing Beams
Courtesy of Philip Lütken

Throughout the project, unnecessary layers have been removed in favor of saving on the budget and instead refining the necessary finishes and elements. The blocks have been painted directly with silicate mineral paint, allowing the blocks to be breathable and absorb moisture from the house. The wooden beams have been left visible and treated with wax. On the exterior, the lime mortar of the brickwork allows the bricks to be reused in the future. The bricks have been laid and jointed in one go, resulting in a rough expression. It is different from what exists, but it is not intended to look new.

House for a grandmother / Philip Lütken - Interior photography, Bedroom
Courtesy of Philip Lütken
 
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