Crisis in La Mojana: Caregato and Cauca River affected by illegal mining by the Clan del Golfo

Crisis in La Mojana: Caregato and Cauca River affected by illegal mining by the Clan del Golfo
Crisis in La Mojana: Caregato and Cauca River affected by illegal mining by the Clan del Golfo

La Mojana is a region affected by recurrent flooding and now by an even more insidious threat: mercury contamination due to illegal mining.

Carlos Carrillo, director of the National Unit for Disaster Risk Management (UNGRD), exposed the critical reality during a public statement about the emergency caused by the overflowing of the Cauca River and the rupture in the Caregato sector.

Carrillo expressed heightened concern not only about the natural disaster that has displaced communities, devastated crops and wiped out livestock, but also about environmental and human poisoning with mercury, a dangerous byproduct of unregulated mining activities.

This toxin, according to reports, has permeated the local food chain, even affecting the hair of residents, revealing an alarming scenario regarding public health and food security in the region.

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Furthermore, the director of the UNGRD denounced the involvement of criminal groups such as the Clan del Golfo in these illicit activities, underscoring the complexity and seriousness of the problem as a public order issue of considerable magnitude.

In the context of this crisis, Carrillo also pointed to contractual irresponsibility on the part of those in charge of closing the Caregato gap, an obligation previously agreed upon but unfulfilled.

The UNGRD has had to take legal measures to demand compliance with these essential commitments for the protection and well-being of the population of La Mojana.

Reflecting on the social impact of the crisis, the director highlighted his special concern for small farmers and rice growers, whose lives and livelihoods are intrinsically linked to their local environment, as opposed to large landowners who reside in distant, affluent urban areas. .

Carrillo reiterated his commitment to social justice and equity in the management of the crisis, ensuring that resettlement and aid actions will focus on keeping these farmers within their productive communities, avoiding their forced displacement to impoverished urban peripheries.

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