San José approves the sale of accessory dwelling units (ADUs) without selling land: would you buy one?

San José approves the sale of accessory dwelling units (ADUs) without selling land: would you buy one?
San José approves the sale of accessory dwelling units (ADUs) without selling land: would you buy one?

SAN JOSÉ, CA.- The San Jose City Council has become the first entity in California to allow the independent sale of Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs), beginning in mid-July 2024.

This recently passed measure potentially transforms ADUs into a new generation of starter homes that can be purchased at a fraction of the cost of a full-size home on an oversized lot.

This action comes within the framework of the implementation of last year’s Assembly Bill 1033, which establishes the process that homeowners must follow to sell their ADU without selling the land on which it is located.

Under AB 1033, local governments can solve the problem of separate ADU sales by allowing homeowners to treat their home and ADU as condominiums, with shared obligations but separate titles.

This creates an opportunity for new housing stock that is easier to build, according to Rafael Pérez, board president of the Casita Coalition, a housing advocacy group.

Since state lawmakers began promoting ADUs, interest has skyrocketed.

In Los Angeles County alone, nearly 60,000 ADU permits have been issued since 2018.

Despite the promise of the move, some experts warn that converting the house and the ADU on your lot into condominiums will not be a quick, easy or cheap process.

An attorney, surveyor, and civil engineer will need to be hired, as well as a homeowner’s association created for the house and ADU.

AB 1033’s potential to encourage more people to build ADUs remains to be seen, as many local entities across the state are taking a “wait and see” stance on how implementation of the measure plays out.

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This May 27th marks 87 years since the inauguration of the Golden Gate Bridge, an iconic structure in San Francisco. This engineering milestone began construction in 1933, in the midst of the Great Depression, a period characterized by economic and social difficulties. Despite the adversities and criticism that arose at the time, the bridge was inaugurated in 1937.

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The Golden Gate Bridge and Highway District was chartered in 1928 with the task of designing, constructing and financing the Golden Gate Bridge. However, fundraising for construction was hampered by the Crash of ’29, a stock market crash that marked the beginning of the Great Depression.

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This led to the need to sell $30 million in bonds in 1930 to finance construction. The bonds were not sold until 1932, when Amadeo Giannini, founder of Bank of America, agreed to purchase the entire outstanding amount. This decision was made with the aim of helping the local economy in a time of difficulty.

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Construction of the Golden Gate began on January 5, 1933. The total cost of the project exceeded $35 million. Joseph Strauss was the chief engineer and supervised construction daily.

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During this process, safety nets were installed under the bridge under construction, saving the lives of many workers who could have fallen during their work.

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By mid-1935, the bridge’s two towers, measuring 227 meters high, were ready to support the two main cables. The manufacturing of these cables was done at the construction site using a process known as “cable spinning.” This method was invented by John A. Roebling in the 19th century.

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Today, the bridge is part of Interstate Route 101 and California State Route 1. On a typical day, approximately 100,000 vehicles pass over the bridge.

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The structure has a total of six lanes and a sidewalk on each side, allowing it to handle large volumes of traffic.

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It is important to mention that the Golden Gate Bridge is not only a functional structure, but also an important cultural and tourist landmark.

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Since its opening, it has attracted millions of visitors each year and has appeared in numerous films and television shows. In addition, it has resisted numerous earthquakes and storms, demonstrating its robustness and durability over time.

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The Golden Gate has installed a 1.7-mile steel net to prevent suicides. Although it prevents deaths from falls, it could still cause serious injuries. This project was started in 2018 and was recently completed.

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