Generation Z has made shadow stand-ins a trend in teleworking, and they believe that their questionable strategy is here to stay

Generation Z has made shadow stand-ins a trend in teleworking, and they believe that their questionable strategy is here to stay
Generation Z has made shadow stand-ins a trend in teleworking, and they believe that their questionable strategy is here to stay
  • Secret outsourcing craze sweeps Silicon Valley

  • Remote work has sparked a professional philosophy against corporatism

What companies have been doing for years with armies of employees in India or other Asian countries has evolved into something more. It’s not just that companies are embracing the Borderless Talent for their hiring taking advantage of the telecommutingis that the Generation Z is encouraging employees to do the same based on Shadow Stand-ins to do part of their job.

What was in the late 2000s a parody where outsourcing reached the point where cheap labor was paid to complete even the most absurd tasks, has ended up surpassing fiction. It is not just that the remote work is being used to pay friends or family to complete certain tasks, a kind of underground economy is beginning to be created based on substitutes.

The evolution of teleworking and invisible outsourcing

Philosophy has been warning us for years about the dangers of globalization, warning us how all those benefits would end up awakening quite a few problems and moral dilemmas. With the arrival of the pandemic and the rise of teleworking, this large-scale evolution was our salvation, and once that joy was overcome, it began to draw those fine and questionable ethical lines in the form of invisible outsourcing hidden behind a bombastic anglicism like that of the Shadow Stand-ins that spread across Silicon Valley.

With the Generation Z As the main driver, those questioned about the practice believe that it is not just a way of working, but a professional philosophy as valid as any other. In a recent statement, a young employee of a Chicago publishing house summed it up perfectly this way: “I don’t see anything wrong with it, especially because if my company doesn’t do everything possible to keep me happy and healthy, then that responsibility falls on me.”

Far from being an isolated case, there are already pages that offer professional online support and that, from countries such as India or the Philippines, offer 24-hour help to “complete assigned tasks on time” to those who have “difficulty finishing the work on their own.” A collection of virtual assistants who, also organized in forums and social networks such as Linkedin, are even willing to complete interviews or admission tests for future teleworking positions or similar models.

In contrast to the “they don’t hurt anyone” approach that is easy to fall into, cases such as that of a Java developer who uses Shadow Stand-ins In order to keep their three jobs, they begin to draw that fine moral line, where, in spite of how good it sounds to work less and step on corporatism, there is the downside of exploiting foreign workers.

His multi-job model means he lives in Southeast Asia, told his bosses he’s in the U.S. to avoid geographic pay, and has Filipino workers complete his jobs for a pittance while he pockets three American salaries. The law is made, the trap is set.

Image | Koffi2150 on Midjourney

At 3DJuegos | Google has studied Generation Z and its Timepass mode, and what it has discovered is a problem that affects us all

At 3DJuegos | He was banned from teleworking and forced to return to the office. He has taken revenge on his boss by paying him back in the same coin

 
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