Venezuela | Thousands of protesters marched to demand equal rights and an end to discrimination against the LGBTQ+ community

Venezuela | Thousands of protesters marched to demand equal rights and an end to discrimination against the LGBTQ+ community
Venezuela | Thousands of protesters marched to demand equal rights and an end to discrimination against the LGBTQ+ community

Venezuelans demand equal marriage and end to discrimination in massive demonstration

Thousands of Venezuelans gathered on Sunday in various streets of Caracas, carrying the rainbow flag and banners, to demand equal rights and an end to discrimination against the LGBTI community.

Despite the drizzle that fell on the city, the demonstration continued, bringing together members of the LGBTI collective, representatives of NGOs defending human rights, diplomats and young people who marched through several streets of the Venezuelan capital.

The protesters carried signs demanding the right to same-sex marriage, the ability to show affection in public without being discriminated against, respect for human rights and acceptance of diversity.

“We want to fight for same-sex marriage in Venezuela, we want to fight for me to be with my partner, all of a sudden, in a shopping centre, eating ice cream and we can hold hands,” Luis Miguel Urdaneta told EFE, who travelled from the state of Zulia (west, bordering Colombia) to take part in the march.

She also expressed her hope that Venezuelan society would change and not discriminate against “someone because they love another person of the same gender.”

Human rights activist Richelle Briceño explained that this march has been organized in Venezuela for 24 years, “and it is very important to know that the LGBTI population is growing.”

“What motivates the LGBTI population is the hope that at some point they will be certain that their rights will be achieved in the laws and public policies of this country,” he told EFE.

The lawyer indicated that the LGBTI community in the Caribbean nation is demanding rights, respect and proudly celebrating “the fact of living, of being, of feeling, of existing and of being part of this society.”

The Venezuelan Observatory of LGBTIQ+ Violence reported last May, during the presentation of its annual report, that at least four trans women were murdered in the country in 2023, and counted 461 attacks, most of them due to “discriminatory speech.”

According to the organization, 138 murders of trans people have been documented in the last 16 years and “there is no public information” about the judicial processes of these cases, while “reparation measures for these fatal events are non-existent.”

In Venezuela, homosexuals are not allowed to donate blood, trans people are forced to legally identify themselves with a name that does not represent them, and same-sex couples do not have the right to marry, among other prohibitions that motivate the struggles of this population.

SUMARIUM

 
For Latest Updates Follow us on Google News
 

-

PREV Video. NO COMMENT: At least six dead in protests in Bangladesh
NEXT Free DNI campaign launched from July 22 to 25: find out the districts and the requirements to be a beneficiary