Stephen King refused to let the most grotesque scene from ‘Living Graveyard’ be removed from the final cut

Stephen King refused to let the most grotesque scene from ‘Living Graveyard’ be removed from the final cut
Stephen King refused to let the most grotesque scene from ‘Living Graveyard’ be removed from the final cut

One day in the field, Stephen King He almost lost his son. The one who would later grow up to become the writer Owen King broke free from his father’s hand and ran at full speed towards the road. The novelist was able to recover from the shock and reached his son before he stepped onto the asphalt, whose trepidation revealed the proximity of a vehicle. That morning, Stephen King was aware of two things: that a father cannot afford even a minute of relaxation, and that he had the premise of a novel on his hands. This was published shortly after under the title animal cemetery.

Readers of this book, one of the author’s best, will recognize the real episode that King would later capture in animal cemetery. For the Maine novelist, this is his scariest noveland the cinema has taken good note of this, since up to four adaptations of animal cemetery. The first time it was brought to the big screen was in 1989, less than a decade after the novel was published, and with the title in Spain of living cemetery. King took over the script from him, which resulted in greater fidelity than the 2019 version, and in maintaining a scene that the producers wanted to eliminate.

Gage’s funeral in ‘Living Graveyard’
Cinemania

What scene did Stephen King fight for?

Without going into details so as not to spoil it for those who have not read or seen any of the versions of animal cemetery, there are worse scenes than this. There are more terrifying, more gruesome and more tragic. But none so grotesque and pathetic like the one where, during little Gage’s funeral, his father is slapped by his father-in-law and, as he falls, he knocks over his son’s coffin. The coffin opens and allows those present to see the child’s destroyed and mutilated body.

Mary Lambertthe director of living cemetery, wanted this scene in his film, but he was in a clear minority. However, her only ally was also her most important: Stephen King had her back. “All the people who worked with me They wanted to remove that scene because they thought it was too sad”Lambert said. “Stephen was very supportive in the moment by saying no because the scene contained important elements.”


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