Adam Driver arrives at Prime Mexico in a biopic that was ignored at the Oscars but triumphed for critics

Adam Driver arrives at Prime Mexico in a biopic that was ignored at the Oscars but triumphed for critics
Adam Driver arrives at Prime Mexico in a biopic that was ignored at the Oscars but triumphed for critics

‘Ferrari’ is the second time we see Driver playing an Italian. This time with better results

The biopics often err on the side of playing it too safe, perhaps their development is too conventional, or perhaps they do not dare to question the image they portray. There are times where we are lucky enough to come across films like ‘Ferrari’, an autobiographical film that has neither of those two defects, and that is also a great sports drama.

The film, which has just arrived on Prime Mexico, is Michael Mann’s first work since ‘Hacker: Menace on the Internet’ was released in 2015. On this occasion the director joins forces with Adam Driver to play the motorsports magnate Enzo Ferrari. The story is based on the biography written by Brock Yates, and explores professional and financial family problems of a man still dealing with the death of his son while trying to help his team win the 1957 Mille Miglia.

The man and the cars

Although it is a biopic very focused on the figure of Ferrari as a man, with the drama having quite a lot of weight in the film, there is room for the voices of other characters, especially one Laura Ferrari played by Penelope Cruz who tries to elevate as best she can what in simple terms is the classic role of the suffering wife.

Racing is also of great importance. There is a lot of care put into the vehicle sequences, both in training and in the magnificently shot final race, and reserves a couple of masterfully executed moments up its sleeve. This alone makes the film a great watch for car lovers.

The film also It transports us to an era where Formula 1 was very different. Breakdowns were normalized and the pilot’s job was very dangerous. In a sense, Ferrari almost feels like an officer, sending soldiers to an uncertain fate. The great triumph of ‘Ferrari’ is in how Michael Mann gives as much weight to the cars as he does to his characters.

Although highly anticipated and many celebrated Mann’s return to the big screen, the film did not receive any nominations at the last edition of the Oscars, despite having necessary ingredients to deserve recognition. Those who were enthusiastic were in the press. “Each moment of the drama moves with a sense of fear of what is at stake, of underlying emotional turbulence.” They said in Variety. “Mann’s film is all the more appealing for his thoughtful spirit and restraint.” They wrote in Vanity Fair.

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