Karma has saved Call of Duty players from being hacked. Cyberattack steals accounts and data, but Activision says it only affects cheaters – Call of Duty: Warzone 2

Karma has saved Call of Duty players from being hacked. Cyberattack steals accounts and data, but Activision says it only affects cheaters – Call of Duty: Warzone 2
Karma has saved Call of Duty players from being hacked. Cyberattack steals accounts and data, but Activision says it only affects cheaters – Call of Duty: Warzone 2

Good CoD players are saved and the company ensures that its servers are problem-free

With the expansion of online gaming and its growing communities, the number of hackers has increased proportionally. Attacks to steal data, cheats and the software to facilitate them have become very relevant. Currently, Activision Blizzard faces a serious problem: the company is investigating a group of hackers what is stealing emails, passwords and data of the players, although it is bad players.

Two weeks ago, an unprecedented hack was reported in the middle of the Apex Legends League, leaving EA in a difficult situation as players demanded immediate action. Today, the focus is on another of the large companies with competitive games on the market. According to TechSpot, citing a series of reports from the company, a group of hackers is using malware to infiltrate their victims’ computers and access their accounts either crypto wallets.

A source close to the group informed TechSpot that Activision Blizzard began an intensive campaign last weekend to identify the affected accounts and restore those of the affected players, previously including them in a blacklist. And, in an interesting twist, it seems that the hackers are attacking to players who they use a third party tool for cheating.

Malware installed via cheating software

Delaney Simmons, a spokesperson for Activision, indicated that the company is aware of the claims about stolen credentials from several players and has taken steps to protect the rest of the unaffected users. Simmons clarified that your servers and games are insurance and that hackers are not using them as an entry point, but as a conduit through an external application whose name has not been revealed.

Suspicions about the connection between malware and cheating software were supported by Zeebler, a well-known developer of this type of tools for Call of Duty. Zeebler identified several changes in your software and contacted Activision Blizzard to warn about what he called a “malware campaign to steal information.”

For players who do not use cheat software, the good news is that the risk of being affected by any attack is minimal. Still, they urge players to be careful with third-party programs not associated with cheats, such as those that monitor the PCin case you notice any signs of suspicious activity on your accounts, such as password change requests or other similar

In fact, this is not the first incident in which Activision Blizzard games have been affected by software of this nature loaded with malware. During the launch of Warzone, many players reported slowdowns in the game and on their computers, which turned out to be cryptomining malware associated with one of these software banned by Activision Blizzard.

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