NASA will launch the Dragonfly mission in 2028 to study Titan, one of Saturn’s moons

NASA will launch the Dragonfly mission in 2028 to study Titan, one of Saturn’s moons
NASA will launch the Dragonfly mission in 2028 to study Titan, one of Saturn’s moons

Science Editorial, Apr 19 (EFE).- The US space agency, NASA, has confirmed that the Dragonfly mission to Titan, a moon of Saturn rich in organic matter, will be launched in July 2028.

From now on, the mission team has four years to finalize the final design of the spacecraft, build it and test its scientific instruments.

The announcement was made this week by the associate administrator of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Nicky Fox, who stressed that “Dragonfly is a spectacular scientific mission with broad interest from the community. Exploring Titan will push the boundaries of what what we can do with helicopters outside of Earth.

The mission, which will cost $3.35 billion, was initially planned for 2026, but has been delayed by two years due to budget constraints and additional costs caused by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Dragonfly will reach the surface of Titan in 2034 and fly over dozens of sites on the satellite in search of prebiotic chemical processes common on both Titan and the early Earth before life developed.

The helicopter, equipped with eight rotors and flying like a drone, will be NASA’s first scientific vehicle to fly over another planetary body.

The robot will explore from sand dunes to the floor of a crater where scientists hope to find liquid water and other organic materials that could offer clues to the origin of life that may have existed on that celestial body tens of thousands of years ago.

Dragonfly is being designed and built under the direction of the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Maryland, which manages the mission for NASA.

(c) EFE Agency

 
For Latest Updates Follow us on Google News
 

-

PREV TODAY Diary | Peña in Taiwan: “Paraguayans are capable of achieving anything”
NEXT Girls On Fire Increases Female Involvement in Emergency Services