Family sues NASA over metal object from the International Space Station that crashed into its roof | International | News

Family sues NASA over metal object from the International Space Station that crashed into its roof | International | News
Family sues NASA over metal object from the International Space Station that crashed into its roof | International | News

A family from Naples (Florida) is in the middle of a legal battle against NASAby a metal object from the International Space Station that crashed into the roof of his house on March 8.

The Otero family is seeking $80,000 for uninsured property damage, business interruption, emotional distress and the costs of third-party assistance necessary in the process.

The object was identified by NASA as a support used during a battery change on the International Space Station.

In March 2021, NASA ground controllers used the orbital complex’s robotic arm to release a cargo pad containing old nickel hydride batteries from the space station following the delivery and installation of new lithium-ion batteries such as part of the power improvements at the orbital outpost.

The total mass of the hardware released from the space station was approximately 2,630 kilos.

It was expected that the hardware It will burn up completely during entry into Earth’s atmosphere in March 2024. However, a piece of hardware survived re-entry and hit the roof of the house in Naples. NASA collected the object in cooperation with the owner and analyzed it at the Kennedy Space Center,

It is the first case of its kind and will “form the basis” for similar claims in the future, as damage caused by space debris has become a “real and serious problem,” according to law firm Cranfill Sumner.

Daniel Otero was at home at the time and was almost hit, the family’s lawyers said: “If the debris had fallen a few meters in another direction, there could have been serious injuries or death.”.

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Owner Alejandro Otero was on vacation when he received a call from his son Daniel saying that he had heard a “tremendous sound” and that there were large holes in the ceiling and floor, he details. DailyMail.

Photos of the damage show where the piece of metal went through the roof and internal floor before finally coming to rest in the basement of the property.

“Something went through the house and then made a big hole in the floor and ceiling. When we heard that, we thought, impossible, and I immediately thought of a meteorite. What are the chances of something falling on my house with enough force to cause so much damage? “Otero told local media.

Space debris is unused equipment discarded from satellites and missions. It is believed that there are currently more than 30,000 objects in orbit that could fall back to Earth within several years.

Although most space debris burns up upon re-entry, a 2023 report from the Federal Aviation Authority warned that surviving debris could kill or injure someone every two years by 2035. (I)

 
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